psychobiotic

The Microbiome-Gut-Brain Axis and the Rise of Psychobiotics

The Microbiome-gut-brain axis and the rise of psychobiotics

Communication between our gut and our brain is a two-way street. A large part of the signals being sent from our intestines to our brain is thanks to the bacteria living inside us, our microbiome. Our gut microbes have been linked to anxiety and depression, and research is underway to see whether we can manipulate our bacterial populations to benefit our mental health.

A scientist’s opinion: Interview with Dr. Ruairi Robertson about microbiome

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr. Ruairi Robertson about microbiome

Microbiome & psychobiotics, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr. Ruairi Robertson, Wellcome Trust Fellow at Queen Mary University of London. How might bacteria be affecting our mental health? What are the possible communication routes? There are a number routes through which the gastrointestinal tract and its microbiome interact with the brain. The gut is home ...

A scientist’s opinion: Interview with Dr. Jason A. Martin about microbiome

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr. Jason A. Martin about microbiome

Microbiome & psychobiotics, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr. Jason A. Martin, Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork. How does our diet influence our microbiome (and what should we be eating more of to help our gut microbiome)? Do you think the current mental health crisis could be linked to our ...