Contributor: Sophie Millar

Sophie Millar ESMH ContributorSophie Millar completed her doctorate studies in vascular and cannabinoid based medicines at the University of Nottingham, and is currently based in Brussels undertaking a Traineeship at the European Parliament Research Services. She is interested in communicating topics broadly related to drug development and health, and has contributed to a number of STEM outreach activities and articles.

Scientist's opinion : prof. Dr Marike Kolossa-Gehring about Human Biomonitoring

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Marike Kolossa-Gehring about Human Biomonitoring

Human Biomonitoring, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr Marike Kolossa-Gehring, biologist and toxicologist and got her PhD from the Christian-Albrechts-University Kiel, Germany. What is the HBM4EU mission and priorities? The mission of HBM4EU is to protect people in Europe from the exposure to hazardous chemicals and thereby improving human health. Pollutants like plasticisers, glyphosate or ...

Human biomonitoring : Changing environment, changing health

Changing environment, changing health

Our environment and health are closely intertwined, and we must equip future generations with adaptive capacities to achieve sustainable human wellbeing on all fronts. One such environment is our chemical one, present in the products we use, the food we eat, the water we drink, and the air we breathe. Human biomonitoring - a scientific technique that allows us to assess whether and to what extent environmental substances have entered our bodies and how exposure may be changing over time - is a useful public health surveillance tool with which the real-life burden of exposure to chemicals can be assessed.

Scientist's opinion : prof. Jana Klánová about Human Biomonitoring

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Prof. Jana Klánová about Human Biomonitoring

Human Biomonitoring, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Prof. Jana Klánová, professor of environmental chemistry at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic, and a director of the RECETOX Centre of MU. Establishing exposure-health relationships seems like an enormous task. How are the teams actually going about this? This is not a task to be completed within ...

The Microbiome-Gut-Brain Axis and the Rise of Psychobiotics

The Microbiome-gut-brain axis and the rise of psychobiotics

Communication between our gut and our brain is a two-way street. A large part of the signals being sent from our intestines to our brain is thanks to the bacteria living inside us, our microbiome. Our gut microbes have been linked to anxiety and depression, and research is underway to see whether we can manipulate our bacterial populations to benefit our mental health.

A scientist’s opinion: Interview with Dr. Ruairi Robertson about microbiome

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr. Ruairi Robertson about microbiome

Microbiome & psychobiotics, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr. Ruairi Robertson, Wellcome Trust Fellow at Queen Mary University of London. How might bacteria be affecting our mental health? What are the possible communication routes? There are a number routes through which the gastrointestinal tract and its microbiome interact with the brain. The gut is home ...

A scientist’s opinion: Interview with Dr. Jason A. Martin about microbiome

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr. Jason A. Martin about microbiome

Microbiome & psychobiotics, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr. Jason A. Martin, Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork. How does our diet influence our microbiome (and what should we be eating more of to help our gut microbiome)? Do you think the current mental health crisis could be linked to our ...

Alternative approaches to animal testing

Alternative approaches to animal testing

In 1959, The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique was published by Russell and Burch, introducing the 3Rs concept (replacement, reduction, and refinement) regarding animal use in the scientific community. Just over 60 years later, it is timely to review progress to date and the future outlook regarding alternative approaches to animal testing.

A Scientist's Opinion : interview with Prof. Maurice Whelan about Animal testing

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Professor Maurice Whelan about animal testing

Animal testing, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Maurice Whelan, head of EURL ECVAM (European Union Reference Laboratory for alternatives to animal testing (EURL ECVAM) at the JRC (Joint Research Centre of the European Comission) in Ispra, Italy. How do you think progress is going on reducing animal use for scientific purposes, and what is the ...

A Scientist's Opinion : interview with Pierfranco Conte about Animal testing

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Professor PierFranco Conte about animal testing

Animal testing, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Professor PierFranco Conte, Full Professor of Oncology at the University of Padova and Director of the Division of Medical Oncology 2 at the Istituto Oncologico Veneto in Padova. In your opinion, why is animal use for scientific purposes still so common place? Are animal models still essential for ...

A Scientist's Opinion : interview with Dr Jason Johnson about Animal testing

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Jason Johnson about animal testing

Animal testing, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr Jason Johnson, British Heart Foundation Senior Research Fellow, Associate Professor of Cardiovascular Pathology, and leads the Laboratory of Cardiovascular Pathology at Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol. As a scientist, in general do you find that the 3Rs concept is something that is routinely thought of when ...

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