Contributor: Sophia Ignatidou

Sofia Ignatidou ESMH contributor

Sophia Ignatidou is an Academy Stavros Niarchos Foundation Fellow at the International Security Department at Chatham House, London, where she’s currently researching disinformation, as well as artificial intelligence’s implications for legacy and social media. She has also been working as a freelance journalist and sub-editor for more than 15 years, writing for UK outlets such as the Guardian, CNN, The Week, and most of the broadsheets in her home country Greece. She holds an MA in Journalism from Goldsmiths College and an MA/PGDip in International Studies and Diplomacy from the School of Oriental and African Studies, London. Her current interests include media theory, political security, technology and propaganda.

Infodemic exclusive interviews Expert Rasmus Kleis Nielsen

Interview with Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Director of the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism on Covid-19 misinformation

Rasmus Kleis Nielsen is Director of the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism. He is also Professor of Political Communication at the University of Oxford. He was previously Director of Research at the Reuters Institute and Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Press/Politics. His work focuses on changes in the news media, on political communication, and the ...

Fighting the ‘infodemic’: how coronavirus became the litmus test for tech companies’ struggle to contain mis- and disinformation

Facebook, Twitter and Google are among the actors pushed into action in the face of fast spreading Covid-19 disinformation but the efficiency of their efforts will need proper evaluation.

Stephen Turner interview

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Stephen Turner about Infodemic

The infodemic, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Stephen Turner, head of Public Policy EU/Belgium for Twitter. Stephen manages the company's relations with EU regulatory bodies, policymakers, NGOs and civil society organisations across all Twitter issue areas – including freedom of expression, transparency, disinformation, illegal content, consumer protection, and privacy and data protection. Twitter's measures to ...

Luca Nicotra interview

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Luca Nicotra about Infodemic

The infodemic, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Luca Nicotra, senior campaigner at Avaaz. He is a data analysis and statistical modelling researcher, as well as an information and internet rights advocate, working on issues such as privacy, open innovation, freedom of expression, transparency, open data and intellectual property. He is a senior campaigner at Avaaz ...

Julie Posetti Interview

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Julie Posetti about Infodemic

The infodemic, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr Julie Posetti, an award-winning journalist and academic, leads  the global research program of the  International Center for Journalists (ICFJ). Based in Oxford, England, she researches and writes at the intersection of journalism safety, media freedom, media and gender, journalism and disinformation, and the digital transformation of journalism. ...

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Henry Ajder about Deepfakes

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Henry Ajder about Deepfakes

The key point I would make about regulating deepfakes is that, in some cases, new laws may be needed, but much of the harm deepfakes cause is covered by existing laws, or could be covered by amending existing laws.

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Denis Teyssou about Deepfakes

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Denis Teyssou about Deepfakes

Synthetic audio means that it will be possible to make any person say anything, making it even easier to make politicians or celebrities victims of deepfake as there is a lot of publicly accessible audio of their voices.

Deepfakes shallowfakes and speech synthesis tackling audiovisual manipulation

Deepfakes, shallowfakes and speech synthesis: tackling audiovisual manipulation

Despite alarmist news stories about deepfakes heralding the end of democracy or truth itself, the technology – for better or worse – is far from perfect, which suggests that there is still a window of opportunity to prepare society, institutions and regulatory frameworks for the moment it is.