Contributor: Adam Dippold

Adam Dippold ESMH contributorAdam Dippold is a journalist writing for Qubit.hu. Previously he worked at the publishing industry. He has a master’s degree in philosophy and a bachelor’s degree in liberal arts.

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Pete Iannetta about Legumes popularity

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Pete Ianetta about Legumes popularity

Legumes are healthy foods in their own right, which also help to improve soil quality. Nevertheless, grain legumes account for only 1-4% of crop rotation. Pete Iannetta, a molecular ecologist at the James Hutton Institute, believes the humble bean might be the key to a more holistic and caring society.

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Bálint Balázs about Legumes popularity

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Bálint Balázs about Legumes popularity

Despite their nutritional value, legumes are deeply underrated. Bálint Balázs, senior researcher at ESSR, a research facility based in Hungary, explains the importance of growing and eating legumes. Beans, for example, are associated with poverty, but at the end of the day, they could save the planet.

Bean there, done that : why we should eat more beans and legumes in general

Bean there, done that : why we should eat more beans and legumes in general

The world needs more protein, but animal-based protein intake is by no means sustainable. Legumes are a good alternative to meat and thanks to their biological nitrogen fixation capacities, they also benefit the environment.