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novel drugs

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Aroon Hingorani about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Aroon Hingorani about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

Interview with Aroon Hingorani, Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at University College London about Re-engineering pharmaceutical research. Could you speculate what you think are the biggest causes of drug failure? Aroon Hingorani: It is well recognised that the number one cause for drug failure is a lack of efficacy of the drug in the intended indication, ...

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Denis Lacombe about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Denis Lacombe about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

Interview with Dr Denis Lacombe, Director General of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) about Re-engineering pharmaceutical research. Can you tell me a bit about the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)? Denis Lacombe: We are a non-governmental, not-for-profit organisation established for 60 years, focusing on survival and ...

Re-engineering pharmaceutical research for better patient outcomes

Re-engineering pharmaceutical research for better patient outcomes

A so-called ‘productivity crisis’ has been ascribed to the pharmaceutical research and development industry. Despite increases in investment and funding, this has not corresponded to increases in the approval of novel drugs. Why do so many drugs fail to receive approval, and what other means should we be focusing on for the benefit of patients?

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Síle Lane about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Síle Lane about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

Interview with Dr Síle Lane, head of international campaigns and policy at Sense About Science, about Re-engineering pharmaceutical research. Undisclosed clinical trial results are unfortunately common - how does this impact progression in research and treatment? Síle Lane: When results from clinical trials aren’t published it means the same research can get repeated unnecessarily. This ...