Scientist: Sile Lane

Sile Lane ESMH scientistSíle Lane is head of international campaigns and policy, leading current campaigns which include AllTrials, a global campaign for the registration and reporting of all clinical trials and Ask for Evidence, a public campaign to help people request for themselves the evidence behind news stories, marketing claims and policies. Síle is passionate about science communication and spends a lot of time helping researchers, regulators, policymakers, companies and NGOs to talk about science and evidence openly, humanly and without stigma and intimidation. She founded the Dublin office of Sense about Science in 2016 and recently launched Voice of Young Science in Ireland, a unique network of early career researchers committed to playing an active role in public discussions about science. Prior to joining Sense about Science in 2009, Síle was a post-doctoral researcher at Imperial College London working on stem cells and regenerative medicine.

Re-engineering pharmaceutical research for better patient outcomes

Re-engineering pharmaceutical research for better patient outcomes

A so-called ‘productivity crisis’ has been ascribed to the pharmaceutical research and development industry. Despite increases in investment and funding, this has not corresponded to increases in the approval of novel drugs. Why do so many drugs fail to receive approval, and what other means should we be focusing on for the benefit of patients?

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Síle Lane about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Dr Síle Lane about re-engineering pharmaceutical research

Re-engineering pharmaceutical research, a scientist’s opinion Interview with Dr Síle Lane, head of international campaigns and policy at Sense About Science. Undisclosed clinical trial results are unfortunately common - how does this impact progression in research and treatment? When results from clinical trials aren’t published it means the same research can get repeated unnecessarily. This ...