Scientist: Sara Degli-Esposti

Sara Degli-EspostiSara Degli-Esposti is the Research Director of the TRESCA project and Principal Investigator (PI) for the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). She is a Research Fellow in the Institute of Public Goods and Policies (IPP-CSIC) and an Honorary Research Fellow in the Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University (UK). Her areas of research include the effects of institutional trust on people’s acceptance of digital surveillance technologies, automation, digital rights and compliance with European data protection laws, cybersecurity economics and algorithmic accountability. With a Masters in Business Administration and Quantitative Methods and a PhD in Information Management, Sara is keen on applying mixed-methods research design and non-parametric statistics to tackle her research questions.

truth lies text carved on wooden signpost outdoors in nature green soft forest bokeh in the background

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Sara Degli-Esposti about TRESCA project

Interview with Sara Degli-Esposti, Research Director of the TRESCA project and Principal Investigator (PI) for the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC). She is a Research Fellow in the Institute of Public Goods and Policies (IPP-CSIC) and an Honorary Research Fellow in the Centre for Business in Society, Coventry University (UK). Her areas of research include ...

truth lies text carved on wooden signpost outdoors in nature green soft forest bokeh in the background

What drives public trust? Broadening the traditional scope of science communication with TRESCA

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the digitalisation of our daily lives and, by now, we are all a bit more dependent on technology than we had been before. But how can we trust all the scientific information that we receive through the media? How can we have a common understanding of what is reliable when we are being exposed to massive online information flows? Do we trust the same truths? What kind of people are more susceptible to trusting conspiracy theories? Using a novel approach based on social science, the new EU-funded project TRESCA tackles these, and other, research questions.