Scientist: Innocenzo Genna

ESMH scientist Innocenza GennaInnocenzo Genna is an independent public affairs consultant advising in telecoms and Internet European regulation. He is also known via his professional blog RadioBruxellesLibera. He is currently Council Officer of Euroispa, the European ISP Association, Vice President of MVNO Europe, the European Association of mobile virtual network operators, as well as Board Member of the European Internet Forum. Previously, he was the chairman of ECTA, the European Competitive Telecommunications Association, while also serving as General Counsel for Tiscali S.p.A.
At the beginning of his career, he was a partner attorney at Ughi e Nunziante, a leading Italian law firm based in Rome and Milan, where he dealt mainly with European, competition and ICT law cases. He also practised in Bologna at the law firm Studio Legale Bernini as well as the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg.
Innocenzo Genna graduated in law (magna cum laude) at the University of Macerata with a dissertation on the legal status of Berlin. He holds a L.L.M. of the College of Europe (Bruges) and a Magister Iuris from the University of Trier. He has also been awarded a Diplome in Comparative Law from the International Faculty of Comparative Law of Strasbourg.

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Innocenzo Genna about COVID-19 & GDPR

A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Innocenzo Genna about COVID-19 & GDPR

COVID-19 & GDPR, a scientist’s opinion We speak with Innocenzo Genna, independent public affairs consultant advising in telecoms and Internet European regulation. He is also known via his professional blog RadioBruxellesLibera. How would you evaluate the current increased use of data (especially in non-EU countries) and its effectiveness in “stopping” the virus? I have read ...

Which way for EU data governance during COVID-19?

Since the unprecedented outbreak of the COVID-19 virus, the use of data has extensively been discussed. What obstacles do scientists, public health officials and private companies face when processing datasets? And how much digital privacy can EU citizens afford in times of crisis?