Scientist: Deepti Gurdasani

Dr Deepti Gurdasani ’s background is as a clinical epidemiologist and statistical geneticist. After completing her clinical training in internal medicine at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India, she completed her MPhil in epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Cambridge in 2010, followed by a PhD examining genetic factors associated with disease in genetically diverse populations, including genetic factors associated with severe influenza and virus control in HIV infection. Her subsequent work has focused on global health, specifically using complex statistical methods to understand social, clinical and genetic risk factors associated with disease in diverse populations across the globe. Her current focus is on understanding the impact of different interventions, as well as environmental, social and geographical factors, on the COVID-19 pandemic in a global context.

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A scientist’s opinion: Interview with Dr Deepti Gurdasani about SARS-CoV-2 mutations

Dr Deepti Gurdasani ’s background is as a clinical epidemiologist and statistical geneticist. After completing her clinical training in internal medicine at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India, she completed her MPhil in epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Cambridge in 2010, followed by a PhD examining genetic factors associated with disease in genetically diverse ...

Coronavirus mutation vector background with disease molecules on blue. Medical research or pandemic virus prevention banner with COVID-19 abstract images under microscope. Europe coronavirus mutation

SARS-CoV-2: the challenges of mutation and possible strategies

The efficacy of the current COVID-19 vaccines might be lower against the new variants of SARS-CoV-2. The new strain that emerged in the United Kingdom has a higher transmissibility than previous strains of the virus. We asked scientists whether the new mutations are a threat to the current public health measures and to COVID-19 vaccines.