Scientist: Andras Falus

Andras FalusAndrás Falus was born in 1947 in Budapest, Hungary and is a professor emeritus of Budapest’s Semmelweis University and a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. His primary field of study is immunogenomics, allergy and onco-genomics. Most recently, his research has focused on histamine-related immunoregulation, non-coding DNA (e.g. microRNA) and microvesicles, a newly recognised form of intercellular communication. He has written and edited nine books and published over 300 research papers with more than 3 500 citations. Dr Falus is the former president of the Hungarian Society for Immunology. Dr Falus was a fellow at Odense University from 1980 to 1981, a professor at Harvard Medical School from 1984 to 1986 and a visiting professor at Osaka University in 1989.

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A scientist’s opinion : Interview with Prof. András Falus about SARS-CoV-2 mutations

András Falus was born in 1947 in Budapest, Hungary and is a professor emeritus of Budapest’s Semmelweis University and a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. His primary field of study is immunogenomics, allergy and onco-genomics. Most recently, his research has focused on histamine-related immunoregulation, non-coding DNA (e.g. microRNA) and microvesicles, a newly recognised ...

Coronavirus mutation vector background with disease molecules on blue. Medical research or pandemic virus prevention banner with COVID-19 abstract images under microscope. Europe coronavirus mutation

SARS-CoV-2: the challenges of mutation and possible strategies

The efficacy of the current COVID-19 vaccines might be lower against the new variants of SARS-CoV-2. The new strain that emerged in the United Kingdom has a higher transmissibility than previous strains of the virus. We asked scientists whether the new mutations are a threat to the current public health measures and to COVID-19 vaccines.